TypeScript Comparison Operators

TypeScript comparison operators are the same as JavaScript. Comparison operators help in comparing two variables by their values.

Please note that some operators use type coercion while comparing the values, while some do not. Please use them carefully.

Type coercion means that when the operands of an operator are different types, one of them will be converted to an “equivalent” value of the other operand’s type. For example,

100 == 	"100" //true
100 === "100" //false

1. Comparison Operators

Operator
Description
==
  1. Checks if the values of two operands are equal or not.
  2. This operator uses type coercion.
			let firstVar = 10;
			let secondVar = 20;

			console.log( firstVar == secondVar );	//false
			console.log( firstVar == '10' );		//true
			console.log( 10 == '10' );				//true
			
===
  1. Checks if the values and types of two operands are equal or not.
  2. This operator does not use type coercion.
			let firstVar = 10;
			let secondVar = 20;

			console.log( firstVar === secondVar );	//false
			console.log( firstVar === 10 );			//true
			console.log( firstVar === '10' );		//false
			console.log( 10 === '10' );				//false
			
!=
  1. Checks if the values of two operands are equal or not./li>
  2. This operator uses type coercion.
			let firstVar = 10;
			let secondVar = 20;

			console.log( firstVar != secondVar );	//true
			console.log( firstVar != 10 );			//false
			console.log( firstVar != '10' );		//false
			
!==
  1. Checks if the values and types of two operands are equal or not.
  2. This operator uses type coercion.
			let firstVar = 10;
			let secondVar = 20;

			console.log( firstVar !== secondVar );	//true
			console.log( firstVar !== 10 );			//false
			console.log( firstVar !== '10' );		//true
			
>
Checks if the value of the left operand is greater than the value of the right operand. This operator uses type coercion.
			let firstVar = 10;
			let secondVar = 20;

			console.log( firstVar > secondVar );	//false
			console.log( firstVar > 10 );			//false
			console.log( firstVar > '10' );			//false
			
<
Checks if the value of the left operand is less than the value of the right operand. This operator uses type coercion.
			let firstVar = 10;
			let secondVar = 20;

			console.log( firstVar < secondVar );	//true
			console.log( firstVar < 10 );			//false
			console.log( firstVar < '10' );			//false
			
>=
Checks whether the value of the left operand is greater than or equal to the value of the right operand. This operator uses type coercion.
			let firstVar = 10;
			let secondVar = 20;

			console.log( firstVar >= secondVar );	//false
			console.log( firstVar >= 10 );			//true
			console.log( firstVar >= '10' );		//true
			
<=
Checks whether the value of the left operand is less than or equal to the value of the right operand. This operator uses type coercion.
			let firstVar = 10;
			let secondVar = 20;

			console.log( firstVar <= secondVar );	//true
			console.log( firstVar <= 10 );			//true
			console.log( firstVar <='10' );			//true
			

Happy Learning !!

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